Remaining Optimistic

As I enter my second year of graduate school, I sit back and reflect on all of my years of schooling. I have always had an interest in school, and furthering my education was never a question, but it is astonishing to think I have made it this far. Making this last year meaningful and putting my best work forward is significant as, at this time, I do not see myself receiving any degree higher than my master’s. With this, putting my best work forwards means managing my time and prioritizing. Attending school and working will be challenging, but course prioritization is needed with enrolling in a thesis course. 

Truthfully speaking, thinking about my thesis is stressful. There are numerous ways to go about writing one’s thesis, and I am unsure of where to begin. Perhaps, this is something I should have began working on over the summer, but here we are!

As I write my blog post, I have been trying to figure out what interests me. What grasps my attention? What makes me cringe? What topics do I strongly agree with, and what topics can’t I stand? I find that asking myself these questions will hopefully assist me in developing the below thesis possibilities:

  1. The African American community: Being that I am an African American female, I would perhaps want to touch upon my community. From taking Dr. Nelson’s course, I first wanted to write about the effect and/or impact someone’s environment has on them. I would like to see how different people react to the same situation depending on the environment they came from. For example, two individuals coming from the same neighborhood with similar family dynamics and both going out into the world but having two different. One individual refuses to be a product of their environment, while the other falls into the repeated family cycle. 
  2. COVID-19, elderly, and religion: During Dr. Nelson’s course, I did not go with the above topic, but I rather focused on COVID-19 and its effects on the elderly. My research question touched upon how strains of COVID-19 have affected faith in the geriatric population. I am not too sure if I still want to focus on anything COVID-19 related, but I have always been around the elderly as my mother works in a nursing home. Hearing their stories and giving back to the previous generations is something that is important to me.
  3. Work-life balance: Currently working in the same location as where I receive my education and where I live, there is always a challenge of keeping a balance. This made me think of completing my thesis on work-life balance. Honing in employees’ perception of work-life balance, organizational structure, the role supervisors play, and more are of interest to me. Work-life balance is something that I have a love-hate relationship with as it is easy to state that one needs to have that balance, but there are various factors that play a crucial role in preventing that balance.